Personal Bible Study – 3 Tips for a Deeper Understanding of Scripture

Many people study their Bibles without much of a structured plan. Reading the Bible simply for enjoyment can bring a blessing, but having a structured study plan can bring deeper understanding. Deeper understanding of Scripture in turn can enhance one’s Spiritual walk and act as a doorway to a closure personal relationship with God. These tips will bring rewards both to those new to Bible study and old hands alike. Some of the ideas we will discuss may seem quite simple or obvious, but you would be surprised at how many who count themselves as believers don’t take advantage of these simple tools. Please don’t make the mistake of underestimating the strength of simplicity.

Tip 1 Read your Bible completely from cover to cover.
This sounds like the proverbial no-brainer. You would likely be surprised though at how many who claim to believe the Bible have never taken this crucial first step. Sometimes people will claim to have read the Bible, but in actuality all they have done for years is dip in at random places. This practice is fine for inspiration, comfort or enjoyment but will be found lacking if one really wants to have an understanding of what the Scripture actually says or the coherent story it presents. What book or story do we ever read in this piecemeal fashion? When reading other stories don’t we do so from beginning to end? You needn’t be too overwhelmed by the size of the task. Just read some amount each day, picking up each time from where you last left off. The trick is consistency or reading some each day and/or at regular intervals. This should be done as a crucial first step to gain an understanding of the Bible, even before other types of Bible study if possible. Why not start today? If not now, when?

Tip 2 Look up words in a concordance.
Concordances can be found in both new and used bookstores. There are concordances that can be accessed and used for free on the World Wide Web by anyone with access to a computer and an Internet connection. A concordance is a dictionary of sorts. Modern Bibles are translated from older texts which were originally written in other languages. Often the translator had no direct translation for some words so they just “did their best”. Or at times they may have translated a word from the original inconsistently in English. For example did you know that the word ‘Nation’ and the word ‘Gentile’ have the same meaning in the original texts? The translator just made a choice as to when to render it in these two different manners. Sometimes one English word used in different places in Scripture can actually refer to multiple words in the original language. By making use of a concordance one can look up words from verses, trace them back to the original language and discover the meaning of that word in the original language. I have been quite surprised at times to find the original meaning of words the definitions of which I mistakenly thought were obvious in English. Digging into the deeper meanings of words can in turn give deeper understanding to your Bible readings. Can you imagine somebody learning English and never being exposed to a dictionary? Why are we never encouraged to use a similar tool for Bible study?

Tip 3 Follow a keyword from a concordance to all associated Bible verses
Once you find a word in a Bible verse that you want to study and go to look it up in your concordance, you will find a list of verses that have the same word in them. Say for example you want to do a study to gain a deeper understand of the concept of ‘Grace’. When you look it up in your concordance there will be a listing of all the Bible verses that use the word ‘grace’. If you look up each verse and read it in context you will gain a deeper understanding of the Bible’s message and use of the word. This practice may give you a deeper and different understanding of the verse you are currently reading.

These tips form the bare minimum tools and practices I suggest to Bible students. They are simple and easy for anyone to put into practice. I can almost guarantee they will produce a deeper understanding of Scripture and be more practical and useful as study tools than the all too common “hunt and peck/piecemeal” approach that most are putting to use. Be blessed and happy studies.

Contributions of the King James Bible to the English Language

Many factors shape the language we speak. All languages grow and change over time. Sometimes the change is brought about by exposure to a new language and culture. In other cases, change is the result of new cultural experiences or technologies. For words or phrases to gain a foothold and become a consistent part of our lexicon, they must be used often.

The King James Bible (also known as the King James Version, KJV, or Authorized Version) is the most often printed book in the world. Since it was first published in 1611, experts estimate that billions of copies have been sold. It is the best selling book of all time and still sells by the millions each year. That level of exposure and the rich use of language which rolls off the tongue have made the King James Version of the Bible the biggest single contributor of phrases to the English language. Over 350 phrases used in everyday speech come from the King James Bible.

King James of England and Scotland commissioned this translation for the Church of England in 1604 and set up a committee of 54 distinguished scholars to do the translation. In the end, 47 scholars actually participated. The ground rules were: no contentious notes in the margins (an earlier English-language bible called the Geneva Bible had distinct anti-royal notations), language must be accessible to the common people, and a true and accurate text based on the best scholarship available. Final editing of the text was done in an unusual way. Instead of reading the text and annotating changes, suggested versions were read aloud in Stationer’s Hall in London. The goal was to create a text that sounded right.

There were a few problems with early printings of the King James Version. In 1631 a version called the Wicked Bible was printed where the word “not” was left out of the commandment “Thou shalt not commit adultery.” The printer was fined and all the books were pulled from the market. He died in debtor’s prison for that omission.

Up to the 16th century, Bibles included a section called the Apocrypha between the Old and New Testaments. By 1769, when a version with standardized capitalization, grammar, spelling, punctuation, and italicization was released, both commercial and charitable printers publishing the King James Bible were regularly omitting the Apocrypha in order to cut printing costs. Other information included in the original translation including tables for the reading of Psalms at matins and evensong, for holy days and observances, a calendar and an almanac are also omitted from current editions.

The King James Bible introduced 18 classic phrases. According to National Geographic, Google searched 2.4 million of its English-language books to determine how often these 18 phrases were used. The first in the list that follows is the most frequently used. A citation is provided, however, some of these phrases are used multiple times in the Bible. I have provided explanations or examples are given of how these phrases might be used in a sentence.

The root of the matter (Job 19:28) Example: I asked questions until I reached the root of the matter. It was the dog that had stolen the turkey from the table.
Get thee behind me (Luke 4:8) Example: Get thee behind me, evil one, leave me alone.
Suffer little children (Luke 18:16) Example: Suffer little children to come to you and learn from you.
A thorn in the flesh (2 Corinthians 12:7) Example: I tell you John is a thorn in the flesh. He is always picking on his younger brothers and sisters.
A still small voice (1 Kings 19:12) Example: I stood in wonder in the great forest, surrounded by venerable old trees and heard the still small voice of reverence.
Now are the mighty fallen (2 Samuel 1:19) Example: The people of Egypt and Tunisia celebrated their newly won freedom now the mighty have fallen. (Sometimes the phrases are slightly adjusted to fit the sentence although the meaning remains the same.)
Turned the world upside down (Acts 17:6) Example: Elvis Presley turned the world upside down with his dance moves and music.
East of Eden (Genesis 4:16) means outside of paradise. This phrase is used as a title for a John Steinbeck novel and a movie based on the book.
Unto the pure all things are pure (Titus 1:15) Example: My uncle thought the man was doing him a favor by taking his money. Because he is such a good man himself, he can not conceive of someone doing a bad thing. Unto the pure all things are pure.
Know for a certainty (Joshua 23:13) Example: I know for a certainty that Susie drove to the meeting tonight.
Lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven (Matthew 6:20) Example: Instead of trying to amass wealth during life on earth, you should lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven.
No small stir (Acts 12:18) (means a great stir or excitement) Example: She created no small stir when she arrived at the party wearing the very latest Paris fashion.
Beat their swords into plowshares (Isaiah 2:4) Example: Peace activists around the world advocate for governments to beat their swords into plowshares.
Much study is a weariness of the flesh (Ecclesiastes 12:12) Example: Many college students would agree that much study is a weariness of the flesh.
To everything there is a season (Ecclesiastes 3:1) means that every activity has its time to happen – birth, death, laughing, crying, etc.
Set thine house in order (Isaiah 38:1) means to be prepared.
Be horribly afraid (Jeremiah 2:12) means to fear greatly.
Let us now praise famous men (Ecclesiasticus 44:1 Apocrypha) This phrase is used to title a book by James Agee and Walker Evans (1941) chronicling the lives of sharecroppers in the Deep South. In Ecclesiasticus, it begins a chapter outlining the names and accomplishments of great men of the LORD like Abraham and Isaac.

Some phrases are rooted in the Bible but are not actual quotations. For instance, the phrase “Promised land” is never actually used in the Bible itself but refers to the land God promises to the Hebrews. All phrases are shortened Biblical quotes, with most being a set of contiguous words. There are, however, some phrases which combine portions of a longer quote to form a phrase which is not quite a literal quote. An example of this is “Can a leopard change his spots?” from Jeremiah 13:23 which deletes a portion of the full quote “Can the Ethiopian change his skin, or the leopard his spots? then may ye also do good, that are accustomed to do evil.”

Politicians and protest movements frequently invoke the words of the Bible to rally support for their cause. Sometimes the quotes come straight from the Bible; other times allusions to Biblical passages are used. Examples of these include phrases like “Let my people go” (Exodus 5:1) used as a chant by Civil Rights protestors and “Every valley shall be exalted, and every mountain and hill shall be made low: and the crooked shall be made straight, and the rough places plain…” (Isaiah 40:4) used in Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech. In his second inaugural address, Lincoln proclaimed “Woe unto the world because of offences” (Matthew 18:7) in an effort to build support for purging the nation of slavery.

A few King James Version Biblical passages have become so well known that despite theological differences, people from many backgrounds find them familiar. Psalm 23, which is heard regularly at funerals, is one.

“The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want. He maketh me to lie down in green pastures: he leadeth me beside the still waters. He restoreth my soul: he leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his name’s sake. Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me. Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of mine enemies: thou anointest my head with oil; my cup runneth over. Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life: and I will dwell in the house of the LORD for ever.”

Another reference found in the funeral rights is the “dust to dust” phrase from “…for dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return” (Genesis 3:19).

Additionally, when the Lord’s Prayer (Matthew 6:9-13) is recited, the version of choice is frequently the King James Version. It differs from the Catholic version most notably in the choice of the wording in line 12 “And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors.” (KJV) vs. “And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive our trespassers.” (Roman Catholic version).

Another rich source of quotes is the Book of Proverbs. Not surprisingly, these pithy jewels of wisdom are relied on by parents and pastors to guide their charges behavior. An example of this is “Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it.” (Proverbs 22:6)

Other often heard phrases (in the order in which they appear) which were in common usage over 400 years ago and spread by the King James Bible include:

Am I my brother’s keeper? (Genesis 4:9) questions whether an individual is responsible for protecting his fellow man.
the fat of the land (Genesis 45:18) means to live easily by having essential things provided with little or no effort.
put words in his mouth (Exodus 4:15) means to say what someone else should say even though it is not necessarily what they want to say.
peace offering (Leviticus 3:6) means a gift to appeal for peace.
fell flat on his face (Numbers 22:31) Example: Although Nick tried hard, he fell flat on his face. He did not even reach the third round of the spelling bee.
the apple of his eye (Deuteronomy 32:10) means a person who is very precious to another, normally used to describe the feeling of a parent or grandparent about a child.
a man after his own heart (1 Samuel 13:14) Example: Sam liked to do many of the same things old George liked to do. He was a man after his own heart.
the skin of my teeth (Job 19:20) means just barely made it through a difficult time or event.
stand in awe (Psalms 4:4) Example: I stand in awe of his extraordinary strength.
heart’s desire (Psalms 21:2) means what someone wants most.
my cup runneth over (Psalms 23:5) means one is bountifully blessed.
tender mercies (Psalms 25:6) means to submit to another person’s power or discretion; often used ironically. The Bible offers precursors to the ironical usage as in (Proverbs 12:10): “A righteous man regardeth the life of his beast; but the tender mercies of the wicked are cruel.”
broken heart (Psalms 34:18) means despair, devastation, and unremitting sorrow.
pour out your heart (Psalms 62:8) means to unburden yourself of your feelings and emotions.
at their wit’s end (Psalm 107:27) means at the end of one’s mental capabilities or ideas.
two-edged sword (Proverbs 5:4) means something that can have either very good or very bad consequences.
there is no new thing under the sun (Ecclesiastes 1:9) Here the author is bored and complaining about the monotony of life. This phrase is used in two ways. In the way the author meant it or to mean events and human characteristics repeat endlessly. Often used as “there is nothing new under the sun” which comes from the New International Version (the update to the King James Bible).
eat, drink and be merry (Ecclesiastes 8:15) means to enjoy life.
drop of a bucket (Isaiah 40:15) means something small which does not mean much; often the phrase is altered slightly when used “a drop in a bucket”; similar the meaning of “a grain of sand” Example: The dollar she paid for the rice was a drop in the bucket to her budget.
see eye to eye (Isaiah 52:8) means to agree with someone.
as a lamb to slaughter (Isaiah 53:7) means easily led to disaster. Example: The man went into the casino as a lamb to slaughter.
holier than thou (Isaiah 65:5) means a person who is obnoxiously pious or self righteous.
sour grape (Jeremiah 31:30) means to be disgruntled; often used as “sour grapes”. This phrase originated as an allusion to Aesop’s fable about the fox that dismissed the grapes he couldn’t reach as sour and was popularized by the King James Version.
from time to time (Ezekiel 4:10) means occasionally; repeatedly over an interval of time. Example: From time to time I check in with my mother to see how she is doing.
feet of clay (Daniel 2: 31-33) means to be human, usually in the sense of failing to meet moral standards. Example: The politician’s claim to have created new jobs when in fact he had not, only proved he had feet of clay.
reap the whirlwind (Hosea 8:7) means to suffer the penalties of one’s misdeeds.
to the ends of the earth (Zechariah 9:10) means to the outer most limits. Example: I will search to the ends of the earth for the perfect chocolate.
seek and ye shall find (Matthew 7:7) means to be diligent, earnest, and to persevere.
strait is the gate, and narrow is the way (Matthew 7:14) A comment on how difficult it is for man to follow the way of Christ.
the salt of the earth (Matthew 5:13) means an individual or group which represents the best or noblest elements of society.
an eye for an eye (Matthew 5:38) means repayment in kind as revenge for an injustice. This concept of justice comes from the Old Testament (Exodus 21) and from Hammurabi’s Code dated to 1772 B.C. which is credited as being the oldest complete set of written laws.
the signs of the times (Matthew 16:3) means to understand the meaning of events or indicators of what might happen; often used as “sign of the times”.
all these things must come to pass (Matthew 24:6) means to be patient and wait out events.
the spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak (Matthew 26:41) means while someone may wish to behave one way, they actually do the opposite. Example: Although Sarah was on a diet, she ate the chocolate. Her spirit was willing, but the flesh was weak.
a cross to bear (Luke 14:27) means a burden one must live with; a trial. Today this phrase is used either lightly or seriously. Examples: (Serious) Suffering cancer is Jill’s cross to bear. (Light) Washing the dishes once a week was Patty’s cross to bear.
a law unto themselves (Romans 2:14) means doing things their own way without regard to the rules.
labour of love (1 Thessalonians 1:3) means something one does because they enjoy the process and not because they are paid or rewarded in any way.
fight the good fight (1 Timothy 6:12) means the noble fight in the cause of religion; but is often widen to mean to fight for a good cause; can also mean a valiant effort. Examples: “Fight the good fight and save the snowy owls.” Or “John didn’t win the election but he fought the good fight.”

As you can see, the King James Bible is an abundant source of proverbs, clauses, and expressions for speakers of the English language. Produced by scholars and poets over 400 years ago, it still provides rich, descriptive phrases for everyday speech in addition to its role as a religious text.

Closer To Reality: The “Inspired” Bible

Many knowledgeable people, those true believers, acknowledge that theoretically, on paper at least, the concept that the authorized Bible being the inspired word of God Almighty has merit, even if God Almighty Himself is difficult to pin down. Some Doubting Thomas’s however say that this concept is pure bovine fertilizer for a whole host of reasons, not least of which are that the Bible is full of logical contradictions. What follows arises out of a debate I had with an Accidental Meta-physician and true believer which I’ve edited for, hopefully, sake of clarity.

The “Inspired” Bible 1

If the Bible is the absolutely inspired word of God, then God did an absolutely lousy job of proofreading His Magnum Opus. The Bible (and related discards) reads like it was cobbled together by dozens of humans over a lengthy period of time, with lots of copying and plagiarism and alterations and interpretations afoot, with no particular obvious rhyme or reason why some bits and pieces of text were given the stamp of approval (the authorized Bible) and some bits and pieces were excluded. The Bible reads like the first draft of an early attempt at an anthology of interconnected science fantasy stories (complete with unicorns) that doesn’t quite hang together as a cohesive whole. For example, you get at least three different figures on exactly how many of God’s ‘chosen people’ were forced or sent into exile into Babylon.

The “Inspired” Bible 2

Writers and producers of science fiction, science fantasy and dark fantasy (horror) go to all sorts of weird and wonderful lengths to draw the reader (or the viewer) into their worldview. So too I suspect with the numerous human authors of the Bible. I mean Jonah and the ‘whale’ is marvellous dramatic plotting and a sort of “Jaws” story; we all love a good disaster film or story and thus the Noah’s Ark tale or the nuking of Sodom and Gomorrah fits that bill; ditto stories about the underdog coming out on top and the Biblical “High Noon” is your David versus Goliath fable. We also like war stories and so we have an obligatory Battle of Jericho. Another favourite is survival against all the odds and so we have the great unwashed facing off against the wilderness for 40 years. Now take the tale of Jesus missing from his tomb. That too is a marvellous supernatural plotting as were the sightings of his ‘ghost’. I mean just relating a revelation of finding a stone cold rotting corpse isn’t anywhere near as interesting.

The “Inspired” Bible 3

Why is it logical – logic being one of the favourite themes of true believers – to accept holus bolus the bona-fides of an alleged non-fiction text (the Bible) wherein the major players and major events cannot be independently verified? For example, there’s not one single shred of independent evidence that anything that’s related in Exodus ever happened, which is a super anomaly since there should be loads and loads of it. So, it’s not overly logical to accept the events in Exodus at face value, without question, holus bolus. Speaking of logic, logic suggests that Eve must have been a man since ‘she’ derived 100% of ‘her’ genetic material from Adam. In a similar fashion, Jesus must have been a woman since ‘he’ got ‘his’ genetic material from a woman. Logic also suggests that Jonah’s adventure would have been better placed as one of Grimm’s fairy tales! I mean you can’t seriously believe Jonah’s whale-of-a-tale actually happened, not and maintain your logical dignity. Now, in conclusion, can you really name me one Biblical tall tale that features at least of the major players in the Biblical drama, that has been independently verified by Mid and Near East historical scholars and/or professional archaeologists to which there is no room or reason for debate in much the same way as there is no wriggle room about Antony and Cleopatra or the exploits of Alexander-the-Great?

The “Inspired” Bible 4

Most events and most people leave relatively little or no trace at all. But here we’re talking here about the major players and major events in the most influential ‘non-fiction’ book of all time. Biblical events aren’t just any old events. Biblical characters aren’t just any old characters. The Bible raises the bar of expectations. Billions of people past and present believe that the Bible is actual history with actual characters. They deserve to have some actual evidence. If these Biblical characters actually existed, their remains, their grave-sites, would be actual evidence. Alas, such evidence, even dry and dusty bones, are all conspicuous by their absence.

As to those grave-sites, we are talking about the major players in the most famous and best read and best-selling ‘non-fiction’ book of all time and yet no one can tell me where even one of them (like Methuselah) has been laid to rest! Of course I shouldn’t pick on true believers since neither they nor anybody else can tell me either.

However, regarding the final resting place of Moses, look up Deuteronomy 34:6. You get some hardcore geography. Having done that, and having consulted a map, how about making like Indiana Jones, find the site, dig him up, and prove to the world once and for all that Moses wasn’t just a figment of Biblical mythology.

The “Inspired” Bible 5

Regarding the Biblical Ages of Man:

“The days of our years are threescore years and ten” – Psalm 90:10.

“His days shall be an hundred and twenty years” – Genesis 6:3.

Contradiction!

The “Inspired” Bible 6

Believers can quote the Bible as much as they like but for whatever statements quoted like the alleged resurrection of Jesus*, I’d like some 100% independent verification – some other source(s) material. As that Gershwin song suggested, just because the Bible says so doesn’t mean its historical fact. Where is the independent evidence for the existence of Jesus? Where is the independent (Egyptian or archaeological) evidence that the Exodus ever happened? Can you show me the grave-sites of Adam, Eve, Cain, Abel, Seth, Abraham, Moses, Noah, Jonah, Joshua, Solomon, David, Ezekiel, Daniel, Goliath, Methuselah, Joseph and Mary, or for that matter any other character in the Bible? Has the grave-site of Jesus himself been identified and independently verified by ancient historians and archaeologists? True, some historical Biblical figures existed, but that’s to be expected since the Bible was written by the locals who would obviously incorporate local flavour into their tall tales. However, and for similar reasons, you’ll get real historical figures mentioned in historical novels like “Gone with the Wind”. That doesn’t make GWTW an historical and believable document.

*Oh, by the way, there is no absolute historical fact about the resurrection since not all scholars or historians agree that there ever was such a person who existed to in fact be resurrected.

The “Inspired” Bible 7

It is not surprising that some of the minor players in the Bible actually existed. I call the Bible “Historical Fiction” not just “Fiction”. After all, the Bible was penned by the locals who lived in the area and would have been aware of the reality of various figures who were incorporated into their tall tales. It’s exactly the same as you’ll find real historical characters in “Gone with the Wind” or in the twin novels “The Winds of War” and “War and Remembrance”. However, those novels are not exactly the sources one would go to for an overall historical account of the American Civil War or the lead-up to and history of World War II.

Anyway, I’m pleased for true believers that think the Bible is the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. On the other hand, knowing that they tend to be on a quest to be closer to the theological truth, they might like to also consider reading “The Unauthorized Version: Truth and Fiction in the Bible” (1991) by classical historian Robin Lane Fox and/or “Biblical Archaeology: A Very Short Introduction” (2009) by classical scholar and anthropologist Eric H. Cline.

IMHO it’s all just myths and fairy tales for grown-ups. True believers know, and I know, that had they been born in a different time into a different culture, say Ancient Egypt, they’d be spouting with total conviction about the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth about the reality of Isis, Horus and Osiris.

The “Inspired” Bible 8

True believers say there are lots of independent (i.e. – archaeological?) verifications for alleged Biblical truths. There is historical integrity within the Bible that has been confirmed or documented, or so they would allege. I wish they would just name one such verification involving a major Biblical character and a major supernaturally-themed Biblical event like Jonah and the ‘whale’ and I’ll be happy to dance around that circle with them. I refer again to those books by Robin Lane Fox and Eric H. Cline.

The “Inspired” Bible: Cain’s Wife 1

One Biblical anomaly is where did Cain get his wife from? The standard answer is that Adam had “other sons and daughters” quite apart from Cain, Abel and Seth. There may have been inbreeding and incest, but when you gotta breed you gotta breed. Still, I’m not convinced.

“Cain knew his wife” – Genesis 4:17 – which precedes…

“Adam having other sons and daughters” – Genesis 5:4.

We note that Adam begat Seth at the age of 130 – Genesis 5:3 – and post Seth he lived another 800 years (dying at 930 years) and had other sons and daughters – Genesis 5:4. So all those unnamed sons and daughters were post-Seth and Seth was way post-Cain.

So again, where did Cain get his wife from?

The “Inspired” Bible: Cain’s Wife 2

Regarding Cain’s wife, as just one example, when it comes to the Bible, the left hand (Genesis 4:17) most certainly did not know what the right hand (Genesis 5:4) was doing. In general, readers of Biblical events just get multi-variations on multi-theological themes. So when it come to the Bible you can just about ‘prove’ or theologically back up or even ‘disprove’ any claim you wish to make or refute. But since you’re pontificating over an overall work of historical fiction, I’m not always sure what the overriding point is in doing so. In any event, I’m not convinced until those true believers dish up some sort of independent historical or archaeological evidence that the Bible is historical fact and not historical fiction. The burden of proof is always on those who say something is so, yet proof of major Biblical events by the major Biblical players is always conspicuous by its absence.

The “Inspired” Bible: Cain’s Wife 3

Unless true believers can provide me with some independent verification that Cain even existed, far less where his wife came from, I’ll just reword my previous comments and say it’s all mythological poppycock. It has as much reality as that of Athena being hatched fully grown from the head of Zeus, or Helen of Troy being the offspring of Zeus mating with a mortal woman by first turning himself into a swan and hence Helen being hatched from out of the resulting egg. The Ancient Greek myths zoomed in and out too but that don’t make them the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. You’re happy with blind faith. I want evidence, something you are unable to supply. Now, where is Cain (and his wife) buried? Surely if they existed their dry and dusty bones must be somewhere. Where?

The “Inspired” Bible: Job

Okay, here’s a little problem. I don’t believe Job actually existed! How do true believers like the Accidental Meta-physician actually know Job existed? How do they know that all of the events as related in Job actually happened? They weren’t there. They can’t verify one single word of Job – the person or the Book. They are relying on a person or persons who they know absolutely nothing about relating the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. Perhaps these authors of questionable bona-fides just made all of this up in order to present an interesting story. Has any independent Biblical historian verified all of this? Is there any archaeological conformation of any of this rather tall tale? Can anyone point out the actual location of the final resting place of this alleged Biblical character?

The Accidental Meta-physician quotes Job several times. How does he know for absolute certain that these Biblical quotes attributed to Job are accurate? How does he know the English translation is accurate? Who was the Johnny-on-the-spot writing this down many thousands of years ago? Does anyone know who he (she) was? Was this a case of someone who told someone who told someone who told someone?

According to the “HarperCollins Bible Dictionary” (Paul J. Achtemeier, General Editor), the entry for “Job, the Book of” states “Date, place, and identity of authorship are debated.” That does auger well for the accuracy of the Biblical text.

In conclusion, how does anyone know for absolute certain that this Biblical event actually happened in the way and manner described? I say it’s all a work of pure fiction even though I can no more prove that than true believers can prove the contrary. It’s all about faith, not about evidence. It’s not logical to trump faith over actual hardcore evidence. My hardcore evidence backing my point of view is that there is no hardcore evidence!

The “Inspired” Bible: Moses

There’s no independent evidence that Moses ever existed, so there’s no independent evidence that Moses wrote anything. In any event, can true believers tell me where Moses was laid to rest, being such a major player in Biblical terms and all? So here’s Moses, leader of a rag-tag band of 200,000 souls wandering throughout the wilderness – the great unwashed of the times – who stayed with them and guided them through thick-and-thin for 40 years. When Moses dies, just before his motley crowd were to leave the wilderness and enter the Promised Land, did they just threw his body into some shallow and unmarked pit or maybe left his bodily corpse to the local buzzards? [Many of us like to put out food for the wild birds but that’s ridiculous.] That’s not a heck of a lot of gratitude the multitudes showed their fearless leader, old man Moses, did they now?

Actually as noted above, we know from Deuteronomy 34:6 the rough geographical location where Moses was laid to rest. It’s just a matter of some wannabe Indiana Jones finding the site and digging Moses up and thus proving once and for all that Moses actually existed.

Still, I find it amazing that my Accidental Meta-physician spends hours and hours debating historical events, like Cain’s wife and Job and Moses that more likely as not have no actual verified historical reality. He keeps going on and on and on about these Biblical events as if they were carved in stone and available as independent evidence for all to see. They’re not. As an accurate historical text, the Bible has just as much credibility as “Gone with the Wind”, “The Caine Mutiny”, “Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn” or “The Last of the Mohicans”. He is however presenting all of this Biblical stuff as though it was all verified historical fact, and that’s not the case, so IMHO he is being more than just slightly dishonest with his reading audience!

Bible Covers for Women

Bible covers for women make the perfect Christmas or birthday gift. They are great for keeping your bible in great shape for many years. A Bible is perhaps the most important possession that most of us will ever have, so you want to protect it with a beautiful cover. There are literally thousands of bible covers for women that are stylish and can fit all sizes of Bibles. Most covers come with a handle so that you can carry it by the handle! There are several features of a great cover for your Bible that you’ll want to take into consideration when purchasing the Word of God.

Pockets
When you are looking at cover you want to purchase, you should look to see if it has several pockets where you can store pens, church bulletins, and notes from the last sermon. If you are like many people, you may store bulletins from the last six months in your cover! If the Bible has multiple pockets, this would allow you to keep small pens and small items in one pocket, and notes and other papers in another pocket. Some of the pockets will have zippers so you don’t have to worry about things falling out of your Bible. I have had items fall out of the pocket when I didn’t have a zipper on the pocket, so it is nice to have zippers for the pockets on the outside of the cover. Some of the covers today will even come with cell phone pockets.

Material
You can get Bible covers for women that are made of many different materials today. Generally speaking, leather covers will hold up longer than other materials. You can get covers in leather material, microfiber, durable nylon, khaki, and many other materials.

Color
If you want a fashionable cover, you can get covers in almost any color. The trendy lux leather purple cover is one of the most popular covers among women today. It comes with Hebrews 11:1 printed on the front of the cover. Some women love black, so leather black covers are always popular with women. Women’s bible covers tend to come in a wide variety of colors, so if color is important, you can find any color you want. You can also purchase covers that come in multiple colors, camouflage colors, or even zebra colors!

There are many other features to consider as you search for the right cover that will fit your needs. Many of the covers you can purchase for women are designed to make the Bible look like a purse. These are stylish and fashionable for many women. Make sure to purchase your Bible covers for women at a reputable site that specializes in the sale of Christian products, as these sites often have the best and largest selection of products.